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    Tuesday marks 1 year anniversary of Trayvon Martin shooting

    6:50 AM, Feb 26, 2013   |    comments
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    UNDATED (CNN) -- Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Florida teen Trayvon Martin's death. He was shot by George Zimmerman, who claims self-defense.

    The incident generated huge outrage across the country for months and led to a wide-ranging conversation about the state of U.S. race relations. And it's shined a spotlight on Florida's controversial Stand Your Ground Law.

    On the anniversary of the killing of unarmed Florida teen Trayvon Martin that sparked protests and rallies across the country, there is now a renewed fight over the controversial stand your ground law, that could make his killer, George Zimmerman, a free man once again.

    Michael Skolnik, of the Trayvon Martin Foundation, believes stand your ground laws are ineffective and should be repealed. He says, "It promotes vigilantism. It promotes the idea that you go out there and you take care of the situation and don't listen to police - don't listen to law enforcement."

    Late last week, a task force commissioned by Florida Governor Rick Scott at the height of the public outcry returned its final report, supporting the law. It asserts "... all persons who are conducting themselves in a lawful manner have a fundamental right to stand their ground and defend themselves from attack..." Jeffrey Toobin, CNN Senior Legal Analyst, says, "All Stand your Ground is, is a form of the self-defense defense, but it gives the defendant a lot more ability to use self defense because self defense is so broadly defined in Stand Your Ground."

    Zimmerman's legal team, led by attorney Mark O'Mara, has signaled they'll argue not the controversial stand your ground but basic self defense. O'Mara says, "He was allowed to do exactly what he did which was, be in reasonably fear of great bodily injury and resist with deadly force."

    Weeks before the scheduled start of that "stand your ground" hearing, Florida lawmakers are considering several competing bills, ranging from incremental changes to stand your ground to full repeal. Something Skolnik acknowledges will not be easy. Skolnik says, "We're in for the fight. We know that when America changes, we have difficult growing pains. These are difficult growing pains."

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