Here's how to apply for Arkansas's medical marijuana identification cards

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - If you have one of the qualifying conditions for medical marijuana, Friday is the first official day when you can apply for a medical marijuana registry identification card.

While the Arkansas Department of Health is accepting applications for medical marijuana cards, they will not be issuing them until 30 days before medical marijuana is legal in the state. The department estimates that dispensaries will not be ready until early 2018.

Once you get a card, they will have to be renewed annually.

Here's what potential patients or caregivers have to do in order to be eligible for a medical marijuana identification card.

First, fill out the Medical Marijuana Physician Written Certification forms by clicking here. You'll first need to talk to your doctor. Only a written certification on the forms can be considered.

Second, fill out the application by clicking here. You'll need a copy of a valid Arkansas driver's license or other official identification. There will also be a $50 fee. Do NOT use a third party. Patients or caregivers must submit the application directly to the Arkansas Department of Health.

And that's it! The next part is to wait until your card is issued, which the department claimed will be in early 2018.

If you have any of the following conditions, you can qualify for medical marijuana:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Tourette's syndrome
  • Crohn's disease
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Severe arthritis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Severe nausea
  • Seizures, including without limitation those characteristic of epilepsy
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, including without limitation those characteristics of multiple sclerosis
  • Positive status for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome
  • Intractable pain, which is pain that doesn't respond to ordinary medication, treatments, or surgery for more than 6 months

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