SHARECOMMENTMORE

Here are answers to some common questionsasked regarding the oil spill that happened Friday afternoon in Mayflower.

What kind of oil was spilled?
ExxonMobil's Alan Jeffers said it is heavy crude oil from Wabasca, Canada, which is conventionally produced and not made from diluting chemicals.

How much oil was spilled?
As of Sunday evening, more than 19,000 barrelsof crude oil and water had been cleaned up. It is unclear at this point exactly how much spilled from the pipeline.

Did any of it get into Lake Conway?
ExxonMobil officials said Saturday oil did not get into the lake.

Is the air safe for people to breathe?
The Environmental Protection Agency and Exxon are monitoring the air quality around the clock. As of Thursday night, six days since the spill, the EPA said the air quality readings have been below levels likely to cause health effects for the general population with the exception of the cleanup areas where the emergency responders are directly working. Air quality results can be viewed online at http://www.adeq.state.ar.us/hazwaste/mayflower_oil_spill_2013/default.htm

How long will it take to clean up the spill?
It's unknown how long it will take to clean up oil from the spill.

What's happening to the animals covered in oil?
The HAWK Center in Russellvilletreated someanimals that have been affected. On Tuesday, Wildlife Response Services tookover the task of treating oiled animals.

What do homeowners in the area need to do?
If homeowners have claims to file, contact ExxonMobil at (800) 876-9291. If you are not getting the answer or help you are looking for with Exxon, contact Representative Douglas House at (501) 590-1055 or Senator David J. Sanders at (501) 682-6107. For more contact numbers regarding the Mayflower, Arkansas Oil Spill, click here.

Where does this pipeline run in Arkansas?
The pipeline that ruptured, Pegasus Pipeline,runs from the far southwest corner of Arkansas, in Little River County, through the middle of the state and up to the northeastern portion, into Randolph County. To view a map of this pipeline, and others in Arkansas, click here: http://www.geology.ar.gov/maps_pdf/fossilfuels/Arkansas_Pipeline_Map_30X30.pdf

For an interactive county-by-county map of pipelines in Arkansas, click here: https://www.npms.phmsa.dot.gov/PublicViewer/

What caused the pipeline to rupture?
ExxonMobilsaid it's investigating why the pipeline ruptured.

When was the last time the Pegasus Pipeline was inspected?

Gov. Beebe said it was inspected in February 2013, however results have that inspection have not been returned.

SHARECOMMENTMORE