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JACKSONVILLE, Ark. (KTHV) - Footage captured by a dash cam in a Jacksonville police patrol car last October shows a man who hijacked a school bus loaded with children.

Sgt. Richard Betterton says, "It was good to have because we were able to film the amount of people he was endangering and we had it all on video. Caught on video."

In the aftermath of the shooting death of unarmed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, many police departments around the country are now asking if cameras are the answer to clear up any confusion. In Jacksonville's hijacking case, it proved to be beneficial in court. Betterton says, "It was good to have because we were able to film the amount of people he was endangering and we had it all on video. Caught on video."

As for the Little Rock Police Department, they also rely on video recorded by dash cameras. Lt. Sidney Allen says, "It gives a non-biased approach to what happened. No one can say that this was said and what was not said."

The new Little Rock Police Chief Kenton Buckner is considering the option of adding on-body cameras as a more advanced alternative but there are limitations. "But then that does come with a price. You do have to pay for those units, you do have to pay for the maintenance and upkeep. You have to pay for the storage and when you start getting into that, that may be a factor why many agencies just don't have that system," Allen adds.

Despite the cost, the Jacksonville Police Department is weighing their options. "So when you move the camera moves with your body," Betterton explains. They are currently in the process of testing out six of these on-body cameras to determine whether or not they will invest in the mobile technology.

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