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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - "By God's grace I'm alive," Laura Webb explains. Webb's testimony is the driving force behind her new-found mission. She continues, "Our hope is that we can get some policies changed."

Webb's new journey began two years ago-- after tragedy struck. "He then backed up out of the tree and backed over me and then he drove back over me again when he left the scene of the crime," Webb describes what her husband did to her.

After recovering from numerous injuries and countless surgeries, Webb is now determined to make domestic violence offenders known. She says, "I think we need to be the flagship. Arkansas is a progressive state but I think we need to take a step beyond that and be the lead state on this issue."

Webb is asking lawmakers to create a state-run domestic violence registry. Similar to a sex-offender registry it would serve as a searchable database of individuals convicted of domestic violence. Webb says, "I sent out a few emails individually to legislators and I asked would you please be a voice for those silenced."

Representative Charlotte Douglas is stepping up to the plate as that voice. In a telephone interview, Douglas tells THV she is hoping to draft a bill in the next four months to be ready for Arkansas' regular legislative session.

Douglas says, "If you involve everybody at the table then what you see is when you do bring it to the legislative committee then it has a higher chance of passing. " Until that bill is drafted, Webb continues to raise awareness and push for a change that would transform the current domestic violence system. Webb says, "Love doesn't hurt people. Love shouldn't hurt people. This is about the families of Arkansas and the future families of Arkansas."

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