LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas — This year in movies is the year of long but satisfying conclusions to a movie that captivated America. First, we had Endgame and now we have It Chapter Two.

The Losers' Club (James McAvoy, Jessica Chastain, Bill Hader, Isaiah Mustafa, Jay Ryan, James Ransone and Andy Bean) all return to Derry, Maine 27 years to face off against Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård).

There's more nuance to the plot than that, but that's basically all anyone needs to know if they're reading this review confused what It Chapter Two is about. Also, if you haven't seen the first film and plan to watch this one, you're an idiot. Go watch It Chapter One now!

The second film in the series, which is about a group coming together, is absolutely stolen by Bill Hader as Richie all grown up. The ability to bring the same chaotic energy to the character as Finn Wolfhard did is amazing.

But where Hader really shines is in his ability to use movement and expressions to really nail not only the magnitude of the stakes, but that sometimes scary moments need a joke or two.

And while the film does not delve too deep into the sexuality of Hader's character, it doesn't really need to thanks to his acting. You can feel the pain Richie has felt these 27 years as he hides a part of himself not only from himself but from the world and his friends.

It Chapter Two is actually light on the actual horror, but when it happens you already know what's going to happen. Pennywise, while terrifying, is former shell of what made him scary to the kids in the first.

The film is about overcoming those fears, so while it's not as horror-centric as people want, it delivers a satisfying conclusion that could've easily been muddled by a million jump scares.

The best part about Stephen King movies are when a group of friends come together to absolutely roast a bully and trust me, it happens.

RELATED: Here's 5 movies you might've missed this year

RELATED: Angel Has Fallen is actually the perfect dad movie

RELATED: Good Boys is fun and crass, but it never rises to Superbad greatness