TAYLOR, Texas — Dozens of vendors come together for the annual Austin Pet Expo, which is taking place over the weekend at the Williamson County Expo center in Taylor, Texas.

"If there's a colony of cats that can be found a home, then that's always great," said Dulce Gutierrez, a member of nonprofit group Pflugerville Pfurry Pfriends.

It rescues cats that are found outside the city limits.

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"A majority of the rescues focus on dogs," said Gutierrez, while petting a cat.

She says cats reproduce so young they quickly multiply if they are neglected.

"We have about 100 vendors, different accessories, collars, leashes and food," said Ethan Barnett, organizer of the event.

"It's a way to socialize and pamper your pet," Barnett said.

People are also allowed to see pets first-hand before adopting.

"It has a huge impact on the region because there are a lot of rescue animals here for adoption," Barnett said. "They can meet local rescues here and help make a difference in Austin."

Austin Greyhound Adoption was one of the other vendors at the expo.

Sunday is our 'Pet Mom' celebration at the Austin Pet Expo at the Williamson County Expo Center! 50% admission for all Pet Moms and their families! Pets & Parking are free! Use code PETMOM, CATMOM or...

"The longest part of that process is filling out the application, getting approved and spay and neuter surgery," said Chuck Renshaw with Austin Greyhound Adoption.

He says events like this give many abandoned or neglected animals the opportunity to find a caring family.

"Our biggest need is foster homes," Barnett said.

For full details of the event, visit the expo's website.

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